Do I need any vaccinations to see orangutans?
There are no vaccinations required to see orangutans, but humans can pass certain diseases on to orangutans and vice-versa, so contact is discouraged. Depending on where else you choose to visit, you may need to take malaria tablets or have vaccinations. As with any travel, speak to your doctor to get the most up to date medical advice.

What will seeing orangutans be like?

Try not to have any expectations. Remember that it is a privilege to see these animals at all and each experience will be different. Respect the orangutan, so do not call out to it, feed it or approach it. There are other reasons for this: to rule out potential danger if the orangutan feels threatened, and to avoid the animals becoming too used to humans or developing bonds with them.

What’s the difference between visiting orangutans in the wild vs conservation centres?
Orangutans on show in conservation centres are just that. Remarkable as they are, the spectacle is staged and the orangutans are habituated to come every day at the same time for food. This does not rule out variety, or unpredictability, but narrows it down.

Seeing orangutans in the wild is more difficult, but is also more exciting and more compelling. It can also be disturbing when you see their natural environment being compromised by forestry, palm oil and other industries.

How can you ensure that the places you visit are ethical?
Choose your tour group well. There are a handful of local setups — in Sarawak, Sabah, and Borneo-wide — who really stand out as ecotourism pioneers. Going local is generally better. Try to use a tour company who is genuinely local (and not just a foreign interest with a local shopfront), and is actively involved with local communities and on the ground conservation. When booking with them, always mention this as one of your reasons for getting involved.

How physically demanding are orangutan tours?
This depends entirely on the tour you choose to take. Some jungle treks allow you to decide how much or how little you trek, while others feature full-on itineraries with full-day walks. Whatever option you choose, it’s important to remember that the climate will play a big part in how physically fit you feel. With high humidity and temperatures, it is easy to get more tired, more quickly.

Should I tip my orangutan guides?
Tipping is not compulsory nor expected, so how much you tip is entirely up to you. If you do choose to tip, try to do so for both good service and ethical behaviour — this encourages guides to become more ethical.

What is life like on board a klotok?
Klotoks are the famous houseboats that you’ll sail on to reach more remote parts of the jungle or rainforest. Typically, visitors will stay for several days on board the klotok while exploring the rainforest. On most klotoks, you’ll sleep on the top deck in the open air, with mosquito nets and clean bedding. Showers are generally buckets of water (although more upmarket ones may have showerheads) and most don’t have electricity.

A klotok tour is a chance to unwind and experience the jungle scenery, away from the gadgets (and comforts) of modern life. Apart from trekking, watching the jungle go by and eating delicious home-cooked food, there is little else to do — but that can make for a magically relaxing experience.

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